Often asked: What Is A Kidney Transplant?

What is a kidney transplant and how does it work?

A kidney transplant is a surgery done to replace a diseased kidney with a healthy kidney from a donor. The kidney may come from a deceased organ donor or from a living donor. Family members or others who are a good match may be able to donate one of their kidneys. This type of transplant is called a living transplant.

How long can you live with a kidney transplant?

A living donor kidney functions, on average, 12 to 20 years, and a deceased donor kidney from 8 to 12 years. Patients who get a kidney transplant before dialysis live an average of 10 to 15 years longer than if they stayed on dialysis.

How serious is a kidney transplant?

The most serious risk of a transplant is that your body rejects the kidney. However, it’s rare that your body will reject your donor kidney. The Mayo Clinic estimates that 90 percent of transplant recipients who get their kidney from a living donor live for at least five years after surgery.

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When do you need a kidney transplant?

If the kidneys lose this ability, waste products can build up, which is potentially life-threatening. This loss of kidney function, known as end-stage chronic kidney disease or kidney failure, is the most common reason for needing a kidney transplant.

What disqualifies a kidney transplant?

There are some medical conditions that could prevent you from being a living donor. These include having uncontrolled high blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, HIV, hepatitis, or acute infections. Having a serious mental health condition that requires treatment may also prevent you from being a donor.

Who is not a good candidate for a kidney transplant?

Absolute contraindications include: Active malignancy (cancer) Active abuse of drugs, alcohol, or other substances. Severe cardiac and / or peripheral vascular disease that cannot be corrected, such as severe cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of less than 25 percent.

Is a kidney transplant worth it?

Because while not a guarantee, kidney transplants are associated with several considerable benefits compared to dialysis. These include greater life expectancy, better overall health and improved quality of life – including freedom from the severe restrictions of dialysis treatments.

What can’t you do with 1 kidney?

Most people with a single kidney live a normal life without developing any long- or short-term problems. However, the risk of developing mild high blood pressure, fluid retention, and proteinuria is slightly higher if you have one kidney instead of two.

How much does kidney transplant cost?

For patients not covered by health insurance, a kidney transplant typically costs up to $260,000 or more total for the pre-transplant screening, donor matching, surgery, post-surgical care and the first six months of drugs. Afterward, it costs about $17,000 a year for anti-rejection drugs.

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Why is my stomach big after kidney transplant?

Becoming overweight after a successful kidney transplant is a real possibility, as it affects two thirds of kidney recipients. This weight gain is often attributed to the liberal nature of the diet after transplant compared to the pre-transplant diet.

What are the chances of dying from a kidney transplant?

However, the risk of death from surgery for living kidney donors is very low. Living donors undergo careful pre-operative testing and evaluation to make sure they are healthy enough for surgery. In one study of over 80,000 living kidney donors, death from surgery was 3.1 per 10,000 donors.

What are the disadvantages of kidney transplant?

Disadvantages — Kidney transplantation is a major surgical procedure that has risks both during and after the surgery. The risks of the surgery include infection, bleeding, and damage to the surrounding organs. Even death can occur, although this is very rare.

Does donating a kidney shorten your life?

Does living donation affect life expectancy? Living donation does not change life expectancy, and does not appear to increase the risk of kidney failure.

Is donating a kidney painful?

Before your surgeon starts, they’ll give you a general anesthetic to put you under. You won’t be conscious or feel any pain during the procedure.

Who pays if you donate a kidney?

Who pays for living donation? Generally, the recipient’s Medicare or private health insurance will pay for the following for the donor (if the donation is to a family member or friend).

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